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Welcome to My Stars Quilts

We at Kansas City Star Quilts are pleased to announce our newest book-publishing imprint, My Stars. We’ll be bringing you beautiful and inspiring modern quilting books by top authors, with top-notch photography and compelling designs.

Our first book under the new imprint is a compilation effort that will come out in September. We’re leading up to the publication of this book by running Q&As with the authors every week on this site.

From here you can visit our bookstore, go to our other blog site and learn how you can submit a book proposal (buttons on the top menu).  Also, read some fun blog posts and get to know our authors. Enjoy!

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Painting a quilt block

By Tammie Schaffer

Tammie Schaffer

Tammie Schaffer

Lots of quilters get together for an afternoon (or, if we’re lucky, a weekend) of sewing. But have you ever thought of making a different kind of quilt at your retreat? Why not organize a quilt block painting party?

A friend attended one last weekend that was held in a barn. They had such a good time, they are planning another one. You can make a day of it, offer refreshments and drinks, and just enjoy some quilting that doesn’t require a seam ripper.

Photo courtesy Suzi Perron

Photo courtesy Suzi Perron.

In July, the Pieces and Patches Guild in Garnett, Kansas, held a workshop for painting a barn quilt. It was called Barn Quilt 101, and Sue Hageman from the Kansas Flint Hills Quilt Trail committee was the teacher. The cost was around $30, which included the paint; the medium-density overlay, or signboard ; and the supplies needed to complete a painted block. The committee has a great website, full of information and photos of the trail through the Flint Hills. There also is a how-to page that walks you through each of the steps.

Tammie Schaffer with her Farmer's Daughter barn quilt. Photo courtesy Sue Hageman.

Tammie Schaffer with her Farmer’s Daughter barn quilt. Photo courtesy Sue Hageman.

The blocks we painted were 2 feet by 2 feet. This is a good size for a beginner. You could even use 1 foot by 1 foot boards, and get a smaller quilt to hang from a mailbox post or in your garden. This also would lower the cost, and you could paint a block on both sides. The quilts you see on barns scattered around the country are much larger. These “real” barn quilts usually measure 8 feet by 8 feet. They look small from the highway, but up close they are more impressive.

If your quilt block will hang outside, use outdoor paint and medium density overlay signboard. These usually come in 4 foot by 8 foot sheets. If you’re making one that will hang indoors or out of the weather, your materials won’t need to withstand the abuse of Mother Nature. This opens up options for using other base materials as well, such as plywood, canvas or even pallet wood.

Christina Nickell working on her block. Photo courtesy  Kimberly Bolen.

Christina Nickell working on her block. Photo courtesy Kimberly Bolen.

Choosing a design is probably the hardest part about the whole process. The options are seemingly endless. You could make one based on your favorite quilt design – I would love to paint a Red Letter Day block. You could do some curves freehand or sketch a wonky design. You might choose a block based on its name, such as Farmer’s Daughter or Rolling Stone. For your first design, you might opt for a simpler pattern than one such as Mariner’s Compass.

There are many methods used in painting these quilts. Basically, you need primer, paint, brushes (we used foam), FrogTape, a pencil, an eraser, a yardstick, a design and a piece of wood.

Christina Nickell with her finished barn quilt. Photo courtesy  Kimberly Bolen.

Christina Nickell with her finished barn quilt. Photo courtesy Kimberly Bolen.

Things to consider for a painting party:

•    Make lots of room for each person, if possible. You don’t want to bump elbows with someone while you’re working.
•    Prime the boards before your event.
•    Keep your color scheme to two or three colors to allow enough time for drying between coats if you have only a few hours for the party.
•    Cover the floor and tables with drop cloths or plastic in case of spills.
•    Bring hair dryers to help speed drying time between coats.
•    Have something to raise the boards up off the table to allow you and your guests to paint the edges.  A block of wood or a book would work.
•    Bring along some quilt block reference books, for those who can’t decide on a block. At our workshop, they had lots of finished examples set around to inspire us.

Kimberly Bolen's block in progress. Photo courtesy Kimberly Bolen.

Kimberly Bolen’s block in progress. Photo courtesy Kimberly Bolen.

It’s best to start with your lightest colors first. You’ll tape off sections, painting several coats of one color of paint, and then removing the tape before it’s completely dry. Repeat with your next color.

After you’ve painted your quilt block, you’ll need to decide how you will hang it. There are different ways to do this, so do a little research and decide what will work best for you.

Alison Rykert painting by a pond. Photo courtesy Kimberly Bolen.

Alison Rykert painting by a pond. Photo courtesy Kimberly Bolen.

There are lots of places to find information about barn quilts. Start with your local tourism center to see whether there are any trails in your area. Chris Campbell of Chris’ Corner Quilt Shop in Ottawa, Kansas, says the Franklin County Quilt Block Tour now has 37 quilts.

Check out Suzi Perron’s website for the history behind the barn quilt movement. You can follow her on her blog as she travels around the country, photographing, teaching and lecturing about barn quilts.

Last year, Anna Bernard wrote a great post on our sister blog site, Kansas City Star Quilts, about barn quilts in Missouri. And for some modern inspiration, check out Heather Jones’ blog Olive & Ollie, where she hosted a modern barn quilt paint along.

Whatever design you choose, be prepared. Everyone who sees it is going to want you to make one for them.

Tammie Schaffer is a freelance writer who lives in Richmond, Kansas. She writes every other Friday. Visit her at craftytammie.

‘Optical Illusions’ Q&A: Tia Curtis

optical illusions coverWe continue our series of interviews with the 10 designers featured in our latest book, Optical Illusions: Innovative Designs for the Modern Quilter, with Tia Curtis. Her quilt, Tropical Storm, was inspired by an optical illusion she saw on Pinterest. The dizzying affect of the illusion was translated into fabric with hundreds of half-square triangles. You can see her full quilt in Optical Illusions, which is available now. TropicalStorm_D2_1

Tia started quilting 14 years ago, while stationed in Germany. She needed a creative outlet after long days working as an Army nurse, surrounded by the rigid structure of the military. After she left the Army to be a mother, she started a small business, Camp Follower Bags and Quilts, and is a professional long-arm quilter and quilt designer. She lives with her husband and three  children in Leavenworth, Kansas. She blogs at tiacurtisquilts.blogspot.com and campfollowerbags.blogspot.com.

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Tia Curtis

Tia Curtis

How did you learn to quilt?

I am mainly a self-taught quilter. I dabbled in all sorts of different things before I found my style. I still love to try new things and new techniques. I did go up to Michigan to study with Gwen Marston when she was doing her Beaver Island Quilt Retreats. I learned so much from that one brilliant quilter. She has made such an influence on me. I adore her and all her work.

How do you approach quilt design?

Fabric largely guides me. The scale of the print and the tones are very important to me. I like to just throw stuff together and watch it play. Or not. If it doesn’t work, and I assure you I have several bags of projects that just did not work, or at least just haven’t worked hard enough yet, under my cutting table. I like to look at vintage quilts and antique quilt tops to get fresh ideas. Nothing like making a couple little quirks to a design that has been around a hundred years. It was good then and it is still good now.

Curtis 1What’s your favorite color to work with?

I love blue and green. Apple green and sky blue are my very favorite colors. Nature likes those colors, too.

Curtis 3What’s the strangest inspiration you’ve had for a quilt?

I ordered a bunch of Amy Butler prints when I lived in Australia. I picked them up at the APO and was so excited about them that at 0230 (2:30 a.m.), I woke up from a deep sleep and made a quilt using raw-edge appliqué (which I totally thought I had invented right then). I love the quilt. The colors and tones really sing to me. It is normally on one of the kids’ beds. I named it World Peace.

What was your first modern quilt?

I guess my first intentional modern quilt (below) was one I made with Cherrywood Hand Dyes. I had bought a “grab bag” and wanted to really get the biggest bang for my buck. I wanted to use every single piece in one quilt. It was really just a loose Log Cabin, but I really like how the open space around the blocks works and the sparse quilting worked well, too. Actually, that is the sparsest quilting I have ever done.Curtis First Modern Quilt

What drew you to modern quilting?

The first group of ladies I quilted with were a group from the church I was going to at the time. My husband was deployed to Iraq, and I had three children in diapers. If you went to the quilt group, they had free childcare from 0900 to 1300 (9 a.m. to 1 p.m.) I was there at 0845 (8:45 a.m.) with my littles. As were many of my neighbors. Some didn’t even have sewing machines! Such a great group of mature women took us in and taught us to quilt. A couple of the ladies had been home economics teachers and walked around with seam rippers and made us take out bad stitching. I learned quickly what was right and wrong in the quilt world.

Then I moved to Australia. I was all alone with my Bernina and my fabric horde and the Internet. I found out that movement is OK in a quilt. Movement makes it look like a human made it. That is all I needed. I joined several groups on Flickr, and it was like finding friends in the lunchroom. We had similar interests, and with a couple searches on the Net, I could find out anything I wanted to know. I loved it and have never looked back.

Curtis 2How many UFOs do you have right now? (Be honest!)

Too many! If anyone wants a couple, just let me know.

What’s the next quilt you plan to make?

I love appliqué right now. I have a couple applique quilts in various stages of production. I need to turn my attention to them.

***

Our next Optical Illusions Q&A: Katie Larson, Sept. 24

‘Optical Illusions’ Q&A: Jenifer Dick

optical illusions coverWe continue our series of interviews with the 10 designers featured in our upcoming book, Optical Illusions: Innovative Designs for the Modern Quilter, with Jenifer Dick of 42 Quilts. Her optical illusion quilt, 3-D Diamonds, was inspired by a pop art poster from 1967 by Victor Vasarely. You can see her quilt later this month, when Optical Illusions is released.

Detail from 3-D Diamonds, by Jenifer Dick

Detail from 3-D Diamonds, by Jenifer Dick

Jenifer began quilting in 1993, when on a whim she signed up for a beginning quiltmaking class. From that first stitch, she was hooked. In 2005, she wrote her first book and has been talking to guilds and teaching appliqué to quiltmakers ever since.

She is the author of five quilt books on topics from traditional to modern, and her work has been published in many other books and magazines. Jenifer lives in Harrisonville, Missouri, with her husband and three teenagers. Follow her on her blog, 42 Quilts.

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Jenifer Dick

Jenifer Dick

How did you learn to quilt?

I am totally self-taught. I took a very simple hand-quilting class in 1993 and got the basics. My first two quilts were totally done by hand. Then I got a secondhand sewing machine from my sister-in-law. I didn’t know anything about it – not how to thread it, not how to use a 1/4-inch seam allowance, nothing. So I learned by trial and error – emphasis on error. From there, I read everything I could about quilting and tried every style I could find. And of course, those were the days of “Simply Quilts” with Alex Anderson. I often think she really taught me how to quilt.

How do you approach quilt design?

It’s really different for each quilt. Sometimes I start with a block I want to work with, sometimes it starts with the fabric and sometimes it starts with just an idea I dreamed up that I want to try. And sometimes I try something way outside my comfort zone just to see if I can do it, like improve piecing.

Linoleum Floor, by Jenifer Dick

Linoleum Floor, by Jenifer Dick

What’s your favorite color to work with?

Blue, blue, blue! And maybe green or red or yellow or…

What’s the strangest inspiration you’ve had for a quilt?

One of my favorite quilts ever is called Forks and Spoons. I made it to celebrate those huge wooden fork and spoon decorations that were so popular in 1960s kitchen décor.

Fork and Spoon, by Jenifer Sick

Fork and Spoon, by Jenifer Dick

What drew you to modern quilting?

Modern quilting came along at the perfect time for me. I had been quilting for 15-plus years, and I was feeling in a huge rut. My color palate was static, and my quilts were all looking alike. Then when I found modern on the Internet and saw how brave these quilters were – without even knowing they were being brave. I got really excited about quilting again! It really sparked something in me and gave me a new direction for my quilts.

Mod, by Jenifer Dick

Mod, by Jenifer Dick

What was your first modern quilt?

That’s hard to say – I had many false starts before I became comfortable. I think when I finally realized that modern can be what I want it to be – even if it’s not what the majority of modern quilters think it is – is when I found my voice. I love traditional blocks and combining the traditional with modern principals has been an endless source of inspiration for me.

Handyman, by Jenifer Dick

Handyman, by Jenifer Dick

How many UFOs do you have right now? (Be honest!)

To be honest, I have very few. Last year, I spent a week going through my pile. I finished up the ones that deserved to be finished and demoted from UFO-status the ones that I know will never be finished. What I do have left to finish is a Dear Jane quilt that I need to finish up before I die. I have made all the blocks, but never put the top together. Someday …

What’s the next quilt you plan to make?

I’m actually working on a quilt for my son. He just went to the University of Kansas as a freshman this fall, and he requested a quilt for his dorm bed. I was very happy because I didn’t know if a guy would want his mom to make him a quilt or not. I’ve raised him right!

***

Our next Optical Illusions Q&A: Tia Curtis, Sept. 17 

Embrace the rainbow

By Tammie Schaffer

Tammie Schaffer

Tammie Schaffer

It has stormed here at my house in eastern Kansas for the last two days. The gray skies have me wishing for sunshine and rainbows.

It also got me thinking about rainbow quilts. Rainbow designs might make you think of unicorns and Lisa Frank, there are other uses for this colorful palette. Rainbow quilts are quite popular, and lots of inspirational projects are posted online.

Tone on tone, shot cottons, solids and monochromatic prints all lend themselves to a rainbow color scheme. Give a traditional quilt pattern a fresh twist by making each block in all the colors of the color wheel, and then group them by color across your quilt. It’s also a fun way to utilize your scrap bins. You can do some therapeutic scrap busting and end up with a fabulous ROYGBIV (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet, which are the colors of the rainbow) quilt.

Photo courtesy  Carol Turznik.

Twin rainbow quilts. Photo courtesy Carol Turznik.

Carol Turznik made not one, but two of these simple yet brilliant baby quilts. I especially love how she continued the rainbow piecing in a small border around both quilts. The dense grid quilting gives the negative white space lots of interest.

Space Dust by Tula Pink.

Space Dust, by Tula Pink.

Space Dust, by Tula Pink, is another great example. Although a more advanced project, the design is engaging, and she has a PDF pattern available for paper piecing this quilt.

Color Wheel quilt, by Kim Eichler-Messmer.

Color Wheel quilt, by Kim Eichler-Messmer.

You needn’t stick to traditional bright colors for your rainbow. Kim Eichler-Messmer’s Color Wheel quilt was made using her hand-dyed fabrics, and the muted colors give it a sophisticated feel.

Photo courtesy  Steffi Honrath.

Rainbow Star quilt. Photo courtesy Steffi Honrath.

I love this Rainbow Star quilt, by Steffi Honrath. The Ikea Nummer fabric for the background sets off the variety of prints used in this hand-quilted beauty.

There is just something so cheerful about a rainbow quilt. Whether the quilt is for a child or yourself, it’s sure to put a smile on your face. Hope the skies are sunny wherever you are today.

Tammie Schaffer is a freelance writer who lives in Richmond, Kansas. She writes every other Friday. Visit her at craftytammie.

‘Optical Illusions’ Q&A: Jessica Toye

optical illusions coverTo celebrate the publication of our new book, Optical Illusions: Innovative Designs for the Modern Quilter, we are talking with the 10 designers who were contributors. The book will be out later this month.

Jessica Toye’s quilt, Water Ripples, is a dizzying array of blues. It’s dynamic, with lots of movement. The illusion of water rippling across the top is just perfect.

Water Ripples detail

Water Ripples detail

Jessica lives in Kansas City, Missouri, with her husband, Jason, and son, Daniel. Jessica learned to sew at a very early age from her mother and has been quilting since about 2003. She is an active member of the Kansas City Modern Quilt Guild and a professional long-arm quilter.  You can find her online at Jess Toye Quilts.

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Jessica Toye

Jessica Toye

How did you learn to quilt?

My mom taught me to sew as a little girl. I remember digging through a big bin of scrap fabrics we had and making a purse when I was probably 7 or 8, so I’ve been sewing a long time.

How do you approach quilt design?

It depends on the project. If it’s something pieced, I use the computer to draft it. If it is something appliquéd, I usually take a photograph of an object and then use the computer to manipulate it.

What’s your favorite color to work with?

Probably gray.

Roasterie, by Jessica Toye.

Roasterie, by Jessica Toye.

What’s the strangest inspiration you’ve had for a quilt?

I made a small quilt based on a photograph of a monument to Abraham Lincoln in the Medicine Bow Mountains between Cheyenne and Laramie, Wyoming.  It’s called I-80 Abe.

Close-up of I-80 Abe, by Jessica Toye.

Close-up of I-80 Abe, by Jessica Toye.

What was your first modern quilt?

My first really modern quilt was Plum Kebab.

Plum Kebob, by Jessica Toye.

Plum Kebob, by Jessica Toye.

What drew you to modern quilting?

I love that it’s acceptable to break the rules in quilting and define your own method. I do a lot of guilt-free raw edge appliqué and never really worry about the quilt police coming around for me.

How many UFOs do you have right now? (Be honest!)

A lot. To be fair, not all of them are mine, though. I’m a long-arm quilter and have a lot of UFOs belonging to other people sitting on my shelves waiting to be finished.

Drift Away, by Jessica Toye

Drift Away, by Jessica Toye

What’s the next quilt you plan to make?

I’m going to make a raw-edge appliquéd chicken.

***

Our next Optical Illusions Q&A: Jenifer Dick, Sept. 10  

‘Optical Illusions’ Q&A: Melissa Corry

optical illusions coverLeading up to the publication of our latest My Stars book, Optical Illusions: Innovative Designs for the Modern Quilter, we are conducting interviews with the 10 designers who appear in the book.  The compilation effort will be out in September.

Today’s designer is Melissa Corry. Her optical illusion quilt, Old Dutch, was inspired by a field of windmills.

Old Dutch detail. Melissa was inspired by the dizzying effect of a field of windmills to create her illusion.

Old Dutch detail. Melissa was inspired to create her illusion by the dizzying effect of a field of windmills.

Melissa started quilting about 10 years ago. In the last few years, her hobby has turned into a passion. Starting a blog to share that passion seemed the natural thing to do. That led to creating her own designs, which she shares as tutorials, published works and her own patterns. Melissa loves designing and finds inspiration everywhere. She, her husband and their five little children live in Cedar City, Utah. To follow her daily quilting adventures, check out her blog, Happy Quilting.

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How did you learn to quilt?

Melissa Corry

Melissa Corry

I learned to quilt from my mother. When I found out that we were moving across the country for my husband’s schooling, I figured I would have some quiet nights all on my own while he studied. So I asked my mother to teach me the basics of quilting so I would have a hobby to keep me busy on those quiet nights. I made a few quilts for friends and family and then, in 2010, I discovered the online quilting world and learned everything I could about quilting from fellow quilters, and soon hobby turned to passion.

How do you approach quilt design?

I always find I can design best when I am not trying to come up with a specific design. You know, when I am just staying open to the amazing design all around me. When I see something that inspires me, I normally grab a small scrap of paper or napkin, or whatever I can find handy, and scratch out a rough sketch. Then, after mulling the idea over, I turn to graph paper or EQ7, depending on the complexity of the design, to really start working out the details. Then once the design is finished, I am just itching to put it into fabric, and so I go looking for ways to make that happen, whether it is a tutorial, a pattern or a published quilt.

Melissa Corry's Back to Basics quilt has been accepted to the Modern Quilt Guild Exhibit for International Quilt Market in Houston. www.craftsy.com/user/496522/pattern-store

Melissa Corry’s Back to Basics quilt has been accepted to the Modern Quilt Guild Exhibit for International Quilt Market in Houston. http://www.craftsy.com/user/496522/pattern-store

What’s your favorite color to work with?   

I love purple! I sew in a purple sewing room with purple minis on the wall.

What’s the strangest inspiration you’ve had for a quilt?

My In Your Neighborhood pattern was actually inspired by two sort of strange things. The shape of the block was inspired by a lamp I saw at a friend’s house, and then the layout of the blocks was inspired by my kids playing with dominoes. I kept telling them that wasn’t the way to play dominoes, but they said trying to fit them all in a box was more fun. So I tried to fit a whole bunch of different size blocks in a box, and it indeed was fun.

In Your Neighborhood, by Melissa Corry

In Your Neighborhood, by Melissa Corry

What drew you to modern quilting?

It mostly found me. Once I was willing to step outside my comfort zone and give it a try, I quickly found I loved it.

What was your first modern quilt?

Back in 2010, when I first discovered the online quilting world, a sweet friend was expecting her fourth child. I told her I would love to make her a quilt and if she had anything in mind to let me know. She brought me Anna Maria Horner’s book, Handmade Beginnings, and requested the quilt on the front cover. I was so scared! I had never made anything that didn’t tell you exactly what pieces to cut, improv was a whole new world to me. This quilt really forced me to work outside my comfort zone, and I loved it! I appreciate that friend for giving me my first steps into modern quilting.

Melissa Corry's queen-size Starburst was one of her longest WIPs, because it had to wait two years to be quilted. Melissa says it was worth the wait.  www.craftsy.com/user/496522/pattern-store

Melissa Corry’s queen-size Starburst was one of her longest WIPs, because it had to wait two years to be quilted. Melissa says it was worth the wait. http://www.craftsy.com/user/496522/pattern-store

How many UFOs do you have right now? (Be honest!)

Well, if you are counting projects that I have started and not finished, I have six, I believe, three waiting to be quilted, and three in some process of piecing. If you are including projects that I have planned in my head to get started on, quite a few more.

#5 - Melissa CorryWhat’s the next quilt you plan to make?

There are actually five or six nexts. I have two upcoming tutorials planned, two baby quilts, a boy and girl version, for a magazine that the fabric is on its way for, and two designs that I would love to make into patterns, if I can squeeze them in.

***

Our next Optical Illusions Q&A:  Jessica Toye, Sept. 3.

Colors to dye for

By Tammie Schaffer

Tammie Schaffer

Tammie Schaffer

In the last few years, ombre fabrics have been showing up everywhere. Whether you call it gradient, dip dye or ombre, it’s been prevalent in home décor, fashion, cake decorating and even hair and nail colors.

Using ombre fabrics is a trendy way to add some dimension to your quilt top.  It’s also a wonderful exercise in playing with color. But using these variegated fabrics for a quilt benefits from a little planning.

I asked Vanessa Christenson of V and Co., whom I jokingly refer to as the “queen of all things ombre,” for advice on using these fabrics. She really helped spread this quilting craze with her line for Moda, Simply Color, and its gorgeous gradient tones. She’s continued the trend with her recent fabric designs, such as the ombre stripes in Color Me Happy. She also designed several awesome quilt patterns made especially to show off the different colors and get the most from the fabric.

Courtesy Vanessa Christenson

Photo courtesy Vanessa Christenson.

Vanessa’s favorite thing about using ombres is the amazing looks you can get by using them, she said. She recommends that you lay out all of your fabric pieces so you can see the look it will give before you start to sew. But most of all, just have fun with the different colors, she said.

Ombre stripes for Moda Fabrics, Courtesy Vanessa Christenson.

Ombre stripes for Moda Fabrics. Photo courtesy Vanessa Christenson.

For myself, I love that I can buy a single yard of fabric but have several colors to play around with. And the best part is knowing they go together, and there’s no question that they will work with each other. It’s a fun way to add depth and dimension to a quilt made from solids. I think this is especially true when it’s a monochromatic design, because the colors seem to glow against one another.

Stephanie Adams shows how amazing these fabrics can look in her Interlace Nuance quilt. She is working on a pattern for this quilt, and it will be available through her SavyGirl Design Studio.

Interlace Nuance quilt, by Stephanie Adams of Savy Girl Design Studio. Courtesy  Stephanie Adams.

Interlace Nuance quilt, by Stephanie Adams of Savy Girl Design Studio. Photo courtesy Stephanie Adams.

When you’re planning a quilt, look over your cloth and determine how the dye was applied. Some have the darkest color along the center fold, with the lightest along the selvages.  Others might incorporate more than one color, such as these jelly roll strips by Gelato by E.E. Schenk.

Gelato fabric. Courtesy  Christine Barnes.

Gelato fabric. Photo courtesy Christine Barnes.

Measure how wide the transitions are to decide how you can cut your pieces.  Do you want the transitions to show? It all depends on the look you want to achieve.

Ombre baby quilts by Amy Smart. Photo courtesy  Amy Smart.

Ombre baby quilts by Amy Smart. Photo courtesy Amy Smart.

The ombre effect is not used just for solids. Moda has a line of marble ombre dots. Riley Blake also has ombre dots set against a white background. The latest line from Sweetwater, called Elementary, has a shaded print in three colors.

Anchors Away is a free pattern available at Denise Bane’s blog, I Am A Quilter. It uses the Navy ombre strips from Vanessa Christenson’s Color Me Happy line for Moda.

Anchors Away, by Denise Bane. Photo courtesy Denise Bane.

Anchors Away, by Denise Bane. Photo courtesy Denise Bane.

If you can’t find an ombre in the color you want, you could always dye your own fabric. There are many tutorials available online, including one at Craft Thyme. You can experiment with different fabrics and dyes to achieve the look you are after.

There are lots of beautiful quilts and clothing online that represent this trend. You can see more of them at my “ombre everything!” Pinterest board.  What about you? Have you used these fabrics to create something amazing? We’d love to hear about it in the comments.

Tammie Schaffer is a freelance writer who lives in Richmond, Kansas. She writes every other Friday. Visit her at craftytammie.